Biological Control : A Guide to Natural Enemies in North America Anthony Shelton, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology, Cornell University
 

BC-Bug

BC-Bug is an online game created to accompany the EGENTS program (see below). Play the game as a ladybug and eat as many aphids as you can to save the plants in the garden but watch out for predators (birds) looking to eat you! The concept and meaning of this game (in a scientific sense) can be referenced in the Predators section of this site.

BC Bug Screen Shots

Weed-feeders Game

Weed-feeders is an online game created to accompany the EGENTS program (see below). Play the game as a farmer with a plot of rangeland that is trying to raise cattle. Your cattle need a clean plot to eat and grow and you must use biological control agents to keep out the weeds that are trying to invade. The concept and meaning of this game (in a scientific sense) can be referenced in the Weed-feeders section of this site.

BC Bug Screen Shots

Parasitoids Game

Parasitoids is an online game created to accompany the EGENTS program (see below). Play as a parasitic wasp that plants an egg in an aphid. The aphids are killing the plants in a garden but the wasp is in turn killing the aphids and thus and effective biocontrol agent. You can reference a youtube video about parasitic wasps here. The concept and meaning of this game (in a scientific sense) can be referenced in the Parasitoids section of this site.

BC Bug Screen Shots

EGENTS Program
(Elementary Guest Entomologists & Newly Trained Scientists)

What is EGENTS?

EGENTS is a meant to be downloaded and printed as a “lesson-plan” for teachers of 3rd-5th grade students. It is a free, not-for-profit, interactive curriculum for elementary aged students used to promote the importance of Biological Control. The workbook (downlad to the right) is designed as a tool to be used in conjunction with community garden programs. Simply download the book, print the pages, and have your student(s) use the pages as a learning tool and journal. Feel free to use the entire booklet or just certain pages for specific lessons.

WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN, and WHY?

What is Biological Control?

Biological control is a way for people to protect their crops, grasses, and other plants from insect pests that want to eat them or use them for their own benefit. These pests can be common to certain areas, arrive during certain seasons, or be imported accidentally from very, very, far away (even other countries!). Many times protection comes from other, stronger, insects because they are natural enemies of the crop destroying pests.

Who uses & studies Biological Control?

Farmers, golf course managers, and gardeners are people who commonly use biological control as a way to save their plants.

The scientists that study Biological Control are called entomologists. Entomologists study insects and all their life processes and behaviors.


When is Biological Control necssary?

When a pest starts to destroy a plant it can quickly spread. It is important to keep an eye on plants and any outdoor environment to be sure things are healthy…as soon as a sickness is noticed it is important to take action. Call a local entomologist and make sure nothing is seriously wrong. If there is a problem biological control might be needed to cure it.

Where is Biological Control used?

Biological control is used in almost every habitat! Ponds, lakes, forests, rangelands, farms, golf courses and even backyard gardens are all places where pests can be found and might need to be stopped.

Why is Biological Control Good?

Biological control is good because it can stop major damage from spreading. But, like any type of science, you have to be careful when using it. If you introduce one insect to stop another you have to make sure neither one has bad effects. This is why Biological control insects are studied VERY closely, so they don't stop one pest and then become a pest themselves!

Links

Some kinds of lady beetles are disappearing and others are becoming more common. Learn about “lost ladybugs” and find out how you can help scientists at Cornell search for them at http://www.lostladybug.org/index.php

Join members of Cornell University’s Entomology Department at Insectapalooza, an annual, daylong celebration of insects and their kin. Free and open to the public – all age groups welcome. For more information, check out the Insectapalooza website at http://www.entomology.cornell.edu/cals/entomology/news/insectapalooza.cfm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here or the above image to download the full EGENTS booklet

Single Page EGENTS Downloads

1. Introduction

2. Identification: What to look for

3. Identification:
What is on your plant?

4. Life Cycles

5. Good Guys vs. Bad Guys

6. Experiments

7. Notes

Coloring Page Downloads

Coloring Page 1

 

Coloring Page 1


Coloring Page 1

 

 



   
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